Food for Thought 3.11

24 August 2011

How Possession Possesses Us - On the Culture of Things

A dinner speech with Prof. Daniel Miller

Material things rarely have friendly connotations. «Consumer society», «materialism» or even «property» are mostly perceived negatively. Less is more and better: less «stuff» leads to a better quality of life.

Clothing, home, food - we are constantly surrounded by material things, we use and consume them. What does this imply for our social and cultural life? How does our understanding of things, of «stuff», change? How does it differ from other cultures?

By way of ethnographic studies, for which he accompanies a group of people in their daily life during considerable periods of time, Daniel Miller researches the significance of material things across most different themes and regions. Clothing in India, homes in London and Facebook in the world.

At Food for Thought 3.11, Daniel Miller will take an anthropological look at the consumption and materiality of our time. We are looking forward to welcoming you to the habitual hospitality at GDI!

Information

24 August 2011
1 participant CHF 240.–
from 2 participants each CHF 205.–

The fee has to be paid in advance. The price depends on the number of participants from the same firm. Any subsequent participants registered separately will be billed separately. The conference fee includes all food and beverages (including VAT). Participants registering less than two weeks before the event can pay by credit card only.
Language
English

Cancellation
If you are unable to attend, please let us have your written cancellation. The fee will be reimbursed on cancellation thirty or more days before the event. After this term and until five full working days prior to the event we will charge 75% of the fee. In the event of later cancellations we will charge the full participation fee. Substitute participants welcome.

Changes to the programme
The programme is subject to change. If an event does not take place, fees will be refunded. Further claims are ruled out.